History Channel’s The Bible, Part 2

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After watching Part 2 of this series this weekend, I am more convinced that this is purposefully set on dramatizing the Bible for viewers who have little or no knowledge of what the Bible actually says – by attempting to bring these stories to life with a Hollywood spin. For the record, the inaccuracies are not “harmful”, but little things like the Ark being stored in an open air tent for Joshua to pray in front of, David quoting Psalm 23 while walking to fight Goliath, and Samson’s hair being cut by Delilah instead of a co-conspirator are things that don’t need to be stretched, but are. That aside, I feel the dramatic liberties taken make for great television, but are misleading in their meaning and showing the complete revelation of the Bible which is best captured in John 3:16-17:

For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him.

However, it is my hope and prayer (as I’ve said before) that this mini-series plants a seed in the mind of those people to God’s glory and leads them into wanting to explore more and actually have a relationship with a loving Savior who died for them. Jesus freely gave His life so that all of God’s creation could be saved … prayerfully this is the bottom line message when this series concludes.

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4 thoughts on “History Channel’s The Bible, Part 2

  1. I agree with your concerns. I am okay with minor dramatic changes to make it more appealing to a wider audience. But I am disappointed with some of the dialogue – the simplification of the dialogue causes a loss of the power to convict.

    • I have to tell tell you that I agree, but the Gospel is such a simple message that perhaps simplifying it will reach more? I’m not saying Jesus needs a make-over or anything like that … but perhaps the noise of the world has washed out the message so much that this story-line will (prayerfully) allow others to see their need for Christ?

  2. Pingback: History Channel’s The Bible, Part 3 | T.J. Conwell

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